NYC Uber Drivers Strike Over Raise

Uber drivers in New York City carried out a one-day strike Thursday — the second since December — as their scheduled pay raise continues to be blocked by a lawsuit from the company.

NYC Uber Drivers Strike Over Raise

Facts

  • Uber drivers in New York City carried out a one-day strike Thursday — the second since December — as their scheduled pay raise continues to be blocked by a lawsuit from the company.
  • The drivers held a rally at Uber’s headquarters in Manhattan to demand the company drop its lawsuit and allow their wages to be increased as mandated by the Taxi and Limousine Commission (TLC).
  • The pay hike, which was scheduled to take effect last month, would provide drivers with 7% more pay per minute and 23% more per mile. According to the New York Taxi Workers Alliance, drivers would make around $1k more per month.
  • After Uber filed suit last month, a Manhattan judge granted a stay. Uber claims it would have to pay $21M to $23M more per month and raise fares for riders by 10% if the pay hike takes effect. The TLC plans to appeal the decision, and a hearing is scheduled for later this month.
  • After last month’s ruling, Uber spokesperson Freddi Goldstein said the company wants drivers to be paid “fairly,” but any rise in pay should be “transparent, consistent and predictable.”

Sources: ABC, New York Post, and NY1.

Narratives

  • Narrative A, as provided by NBC New York. Inflation is affecting Americans from all walks of life, but Uber drivers are being significantly impacted because of the enormous increase in car-related expenses. Meanwhile, Uber has been raising its rates without improving compensation for drivers. A strike might be the only way to send the company a message.
  • Narrative B, as provided by Fox News. A pay increase is undoubtedly deserved, but the TLC's mandate is exorbitant and will do irreparable harm to Uber and its riders. While undoubtedly a goodwill attempt to compensate for the summer's inflated gas prices, the ordered raise fails to consider the fluctuating nature of such prices, which have already decreased. The TLC should heed its past policies rather than instituting new rules.