US Pentagon UFO Study: No Evidence of Aliens

The Pentagon's endeavor to investigate hundreds of reports of unidentified anomalous phenomena (UAP) hasn't produced any evidence of alien life or activity on Earth, senior US defense officials said on Friday.

US Pentagon UFO Study: No Evidence of Aliens
Image credit: CNN

Facts

  • The Pentagon's endeavor to investigate hundreds of reports of unidentified anomalous phenomena (UAP) hasn't produced any evidence of alien life or activity on Earth, senior US defense officials said on Friday.
  • Established in July, the All-domain Anomaly Resolution Office (AARO) was entrusted with documenting, analyzing, and resolving reports of UAPs, most of which were about unidentified flying objects.
  • However, the scope of the investigation has since expanded beyond just the skies to include all domains —air, ground, sea, or space — which is why the AARO now uses the term unidentified anomalous objects rather than unidentified aerial objects.
  • According to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, there were 144 UAP sightings between 2004 and 2021. Since the launch of the investigation, the AARO has received hundreds more, with an updated report on specific numbers expected by the end of the year.
  • The investigation follows Congress' May hearing on UAPs — the first of its kind in more than 50 years — with several officials expressing concern that the objects could be unknown military technologies belonging to US adversaries.
  • Ronald Moultrie, undersecretary of defense for intelligence and security, echoed these concerns on Friday, saying that while many of the reports could be harmless objects, the UAPs pose potential threats to personal and operational security.

Sources: Al Jazeera, Washington Post, CNN, and Defense.

Narratives

  • Establishment-critical narrative, as provided by Breitbart. The US is currently faced with extreme gas prices, record-high inflation, violent crime that's wreaking havoc, and supply shortages. Yet, Congress still finds time to investigate UFOs. Is that really the best use of its time and resources?
  • Pro-establishment narrative, as provided by LA Times. The significance of this study can't be dismissed. It's important not only because it opens the door for a much more mainstream and inclusive search for intelligent extra-terrestrial objects but also because of the very real national security risk that the UAPs pose. It's about time that government entities shed light on what’s behind hundreds of mysterious UFO sightings.
  • Cynical narrative, as provided by The Wall Street Journal. There's a fine line between deception and disclosure, and the AARO is dangerously walking this tightrope. Most UFO sightings have been rejected as mundane terrestrial explanations and illusions. The investigation, which as usual, fails to actually reveal any meaningful information, is nothing more than an exercise to keep Americans bewildered and susceptible to manufactured panics and conspiracy theories.